Jaw Dropping

Not to sound alarmist…

It’s a balance every site administrator has to strike, answering the question: How can we inform parents about trends in the area of student behavior, drugs, vapes, online perils, without (to put it simply) freaking them out?

Here at Diegueño we know that informed parents are allies in the quest to help students make good decisions and stay safe through the marvelous, perilous, brand new world of adolescence. With that in mind, this year we’ve brought in experts to speak to both students and parents about online safety and substance abuse. We’ve encouraged parents to take their kids to an annual town hall meeting about drinking and driving, and we’re already planning for a series of parent nights for next school year.

Parent Seminar 4-29-15As the principal, I like to be at every event, showing my support for parents, and my availability to be part of the proverbial village here to raise the kids. Sometimes conflicts arise, and I have to miss an event. This happened a couple of weeks ago, when two amazing counselors who run our district’s award winning drug and alcohol prevention program came to speak to our parents in an event we billed as: “Teens and Healthy Choices: The Truth About Vape Pens.”

Well attended, informative, and real, the night was by all accounts a success. I kept a weather eye on what was happening through my AP’s Twitter feed. Midway through the evening I saw a tweet that included a photo of the presenter with a caption that read in part: “parents learning with jaws dropping…”

jawdroppingHonest first thought: “Yikes.”

Truthful second thought: “How many calls will come to me in the morning? How many will go to the district office?”

Then I let myself breathe and ask the more important question: “Is this a good thing?”

And I knew it was.

There’s importance in telling the truth. As our middle schoolers read in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird: “There’s a lot of ugly things in this world, son. I wish I could keep ’em all away from you. That’s never possible.” That’s true for parents talking with their kids, and educators talking with our parents. School is a place that should always keep students safe, and it’s also a place where we need to feel safe talking about even the ugly things in the world.

Sure the result of speaking the truth can sometimes be jaw dropping. Life is. It can also make a real difference.

Empowering parents to have the difficult (and important) conversations with their kids, to keep an eye on social media, and even scroll through the photos on their phones is a valuable part of what we do. Scout and Jem didn’t have SnapChat accounts, but if they did, I like to imagine that Atticus would have handled that beautifully too. I like to think that if he were a parent at Diegueño, we’d help him.

The principal I am believes that we’re in the business of building positive lives for our students. Partnering with parents, we make up a support system for kids that can help them navigate the tough times and be prepare for the future they’re growing into.

The former English teacher I am puts it more simply: when in doubt, listen to Atticus.

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